Events

For the most part, organizations in applied behavioral science fall under a four main types. These organizations host most of the events.

 

  1. Undergraduate/graduate-level university labs and organizations

  2. Internal Consultants

  3. External Consultants

  4. Product Management, UX/UI

 

The following descriptions explain each of the categories above.

 

1. Undergraduate/graduate-level university labs

 

Universities like UPenn, Harvard, UChicago, have labs that either conduct research in applied behavioral science OR directly apply behavioral science to organizations. For example, UPenn Wharton, has the Center for Health Initiatives and Behavioral Economics.

 

2. Internal Consultants

 

Any type of company might form their own applied behavioral science branch within their own company. These can range from management consultancies (BCG has the BeSmart branch), financial firms (e.g. Goldman Sachs and BlackRock), Silicon Valley giants (e.g. Google, Facebook, etc.), non-profits, etc. These internal consultants will advise other departments within the same organization from a behavioral perspective. Most of these groups have launched within the last 10 years.

 

3. External Consultants

 

While internal consultancies advise the same company that they are a part of, external consultancies advise other organizations. Some examples include ideas42, the Behavioural Insights Team, and BEworks. Each of these external consultancies may have a different focus (but almost all have services in diverse sectors): ideas42 prioritizes social impact work, and the Behavioural Insights Team primarily advises government groups.

 

4. Product Management, UX/UI

 

This is the group that is least directly associated with applied behavioral science, even though they still do it. While product managers and UX/UI designers may not directly think about behavioral economics, they tend to indirectly use nudges and other behavioral tactics to make a product/user experience more intuitive, friendly, or easy to use.

 

The first three of these categories often host events in behavioral science. Or, an individual (e.g. Stephen Wendel) or a social platform (Clubhouse, Meetup, etc.) might host a behavioral economics event as well. The following list describes upcoming events in behavioral economics.

I'm a paragraph. Click here to add your own text and edit me. It's easy.